What's the Difference Between a Series and a Parallel Circuit?

What's the Difference Between a Series and a Parallel Circuit?

Linking deep cycle batteries or solar panels is a topic the Aussie Batteries and Solar experts are often asked about. It’s hard to remember how to match terminals or which connections raise voltage, and not being informed can have disastrous results for your battery and equipment.

Simply put, there are two options when it comes to linking circuits: either in parallel or series. The method you choose will depend on the voltage your appliance needs but however you link your batteries, they must always be the same type, size and age in order to avoid equalisation problems when charging. A thick cable should also be used to allow for a steady flow of electrons.

Read on for our illustrated guide to series and parallel circuits or give us a call on to find out more.

Parallel

To link batteries in parallel, the positive terminal on the first battery must be connected with the positive terminal on the second. The negative terminals must be linked together in the same way, keeping the same voltage of the batteries but increasing their capacity. You can link up to four batteries in parallel before equalisation is affected.

Series and Parallel Circuit, Parallel and Series Circuit, Relationship Between Parallel and Series Circuit

Series

Think of linking batteries in series as you would putting them into a torch. The positive terminal of one battery must be connected to the negative terminal of the second battery. This causes the capacity of the batteries to stay the same while the voltage output increases. It’s possible to link more batteries in series than in parallel but be aware that the higher the voltage, the more dangerous it becomes.

Series and Parallel Circuit, Parallel and Series Circuit, Relationship Between Parallel and Series Circuit

Connecting To Linked Batteries

If you’ve got more than one battery in your bank and want to draw off it with an inverter, use the positive terminal on the first battery in your battery bank and then the negative terminal on the last battery in your battery bank. When you connect a charging device to the bank, it’s best to use the same terminals you’re using to draw from the batteries. This allows for an even wear on the batteries and can improve their lifespan.

Find out more about the Aussie Batteries & Solar range of 12 volt deep cycle batteries.

April 15, 2014 | By Aussie Batteries | Comments

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